Posts Tagged ‘Testing’

How Maveric Systems Stuck it Out with Software Testing

April 16th, 2014

F

inally, it was the software that let him down. After years of fist-clenching and hand-wringing, heated negotiations and political manoeuvring, Barack Obama launched his health insurance exchanges in the US early last October. Healthcare.gov, the US federal website, was supposed to make insurance buying easy. It didn’t. Software glitches seemed to plague the system.

Thousands of users were disappointed. The American tech company behind the website was shamed. Critics wagged their fingers and said ‘we told you so’. An Indian business newspaper even suggested Infosys should volunteer to clean up the project at no cost to earn some goodwill from the Americans.

But the alarm bells didn’t ring as loud for software engineers whose war chronicles almost always revolve around embarrassing software glitches. For them, this was just another story that attracted attention only because it involved one of the most ambitious projects of a most powerful man. Consider this. According to a 1992 estimate by researchers, Microsoft’s software has only one defect per 2,000 lines of code at the time of release. Yet, its reputation for buggy software can be explained by the fact that Windows 7 has over 40 million lines of code.

Fact: You can’t escape software bugs. And some bugs can be more devastating than others. In 2012, a software glitch cost Knight Capital $460 million; a few months later, the once promising company was sold off. This only underscored a 2002 study by National Institute of Standards and Technology, which estimated that software bugs cost the US economy $60 billion a year. “Those who live by software”, a joke among the techies goes, “will die by software”.

These are such anecdotes, numbers and wisecracks that once gave independent software testing companies a place of prominence in the Indian IT sector. Around a decade ago, year-on-year growth of 40 percent seemed to be a given, a former senior executive from RelQ, an independent software testing firm, says. A few years later, RelQ was acquired by American IT equipment and services company EDS. Applabs, its bigger rival, was even more confident about independent testing. Once when a journalist questioned the viability of pureplay software testing companies, Sashi Reddi, its CEO, pointed to the acquisitions made by Applabs. Just a year on, it was acquired by CSC.

It’s not just RelQ and Applabs. Several other Indian software testing firms that hoped to make a huge impact as pureplay testing companies either folded up or lost their identity after being acquired by IT services firms.

Take Thinksoft, which was acquired by German software testing company SQS in November 2013. Asvini Kumar, the founder, says one of the reasons he decided to sell his stake to SQS was because it was also a software testing firm, emphasising that there continued to be a large scope for pureplay testing companies. However, the message from the market was different—Thinksoft had been consistently trading at a fourth of its price prior to the announcement. (Asvini Kumar has since stepped down as Thinksoft’s managing director.)

But there is one company that still believes it’s possible to be a pureplay testing/assurance company—and also to scale up as one: Maveric Systems. What are they smoking?

Source:http://forbesindia.com/article/work-in-progress/how-maveric-systems-stuck-it-out-with-software-testing/37548/1

How Maveric Systems Stuck it Out with Software Testing

April 15th, 2014

F

inally, it was the software that let him down. After years of fist-clenching and hand-wringing, heated negotiations and political manoeuvring, Barack Obama launched his health insurance exchanges in the US early last October. Healthcare.gov, the US federal website, was supposed to make insurance buying easy. It didn’t. Software glitches seemed to plague the system.

Thousands of users were disappointed. The American tech company behind the website was shamed. Critics wagged their fingers and said ‘we told you so’. An Indian business newspaper even suggested Infosys should volunteer to clean up the project at no cost to earn some goodwill from the Americans.

But the alarm bells didn’t ring as loud for software engineers whose war chronicles almost always revolve around embarrassing software glitches. For them, this was just another story that attracted attention only because it involved one of the most ambitious projects of a most powerful man. Consider this. According to a 1992 estimate by researchers, Microsoft’s software has only one defect per 2,000 lines of code at the time of release. Yet, its reputation for buggy software can be explained by the fact that Windows 7 has over 40 million lines of code.

Fact: You can’t escape software bugs. And some bugs can be more devastating than others. In 2012, a software glitch cost Knight Capital $460 million; a few months later, the once promising company was sold off. This only underscored a 2002 study by National Institute of Standards and Technology, which estimated that software bugs cost the US economy $60 billion a year. “Those who live by software”, a joke among the techies goes, “will die by software”.

These are such anecdotes, numbers and wisecracks that once gave independent software testing companies a place of prominence in the Indian IT sector. Around a decade ago, year-on-year growth of 40 percent seemed to be a given, a former senior executive from RelQ, an independent software testing firm, says. A few years later, RelQ was acquired by American IT equipment and services company EDS. Applabs, its bigger rival, was even more confident about independent testing. Once when a journalist questioned the viability of pureplay software testing companies, Sashi Reddi, its CEO, pointed to the acquisitions made by Applabs. Just a year on, it was acquired by CSC.

It’s not just RelQ and Applabs. Several other Indian software testing firms that hoped to make a huge impact as pureplay testing companies either folded up or lost their identity after being acquired by IT services firms.

Take Thinksoft, which was acquired by German software testing company SQS in November 2013. Asvini Kumar, the founder, says one of the reasons he decided to sell his stake to SQS was because it was also a software testing firm, emphasising that there continued to be a large scope for pureplay testing companies. However, the message from the market was different—Thinksoft had been consistently trading at a fourth of its price prior to the announcement. (Asvini Kumar has since stepped down as Thinksoft’s managing director.)

But there is one company that still believes it’s possible to be a pureplay testing/assurance company—and also to scale up as one: Maveric Systems. What are they smoking?

Source:http://forbesindia.com/article/work-in-progress/how-maveric-systems-stuck-it-out-with-software-testing/37548/1

National Software Testing Conference Arrives In London

April 7th, 2014

Expedia, Waitrose, SEGA and Barclaycard are just some of the companies speaking at the first ever National Software Testing Conference, taking place May 20th-21st 2014 at The British Museum, London.

The National Software Testing Conference is a UK-based, with European reach, event that provides the software testing community, as well as CIOs, CTOs
and directors of IT with:

- Invaluable content delivered by speakers from well-known companies.

- Presentations from the winners and finalists of The European Software Testing Awards.

- Executive Debate sessions facilitated and led by key figures.

- A market leading exhibition, which will enable delegates to view the latest products and services available to them.

Rod Armstrong, senior director of QA at Expedia, the world’s largest online travel company, said:

“It’s not often so many like-minded people are brought together to share insights and learn from each other. I’m looking forward to spending time with as many of you as possible, together we can drive our competency forward to ensure it gets the recognition it deserves in the wider software development community. See you in May.”

Sophie-Marie Odum, editor of the industry-leading journal, TEST Magazine, added:

“We are really excited about our line-up. They each respectively have a wealth of experience that I’m sure many delegates can gain from, allowing them to head back to the office and implement change with immediate effect.

“We have selected a broad range of speakers based on their exceptional levels of knowledge, which includes finalists and winners from The European Software Testing Awards, who have and fought their way through literally dozens and dozens of like-minded professionals and come out on top.”

Companies such as McDonalds; BUPA; Deloitte; the Home Office; New Look; HSBC; Virgin Media; plus many more have already confirmed their attendance at the National Software Testing Conference, will you be joining them?

Source:http://www.economicvoice.com/national-software-testing-conference-arrives-in-london/

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