Posts Tagged ‘Speeds’

Wind River software speeds Android IVI development

April 20th, 2012

Wind River has expanded its portfolio of Android offerings with the introduction of automotive-market specific software. Wind River Solution Accelerator for Android, Automotive, the latest addition to the Wind River Solution Accelerator for Android series, helps in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) device manufacturers shorten development time for Android-based IVI systems.

Key features of Wind River Solution Accelerator for Android, Automotive include iPod/iPhone/iPad docking for rich multimedia features, a customizable user interface that can be modified by the consumer, and FM radio.

The Wind River Solution Accelerator for Android portfolio of software offers developers a catalog of validated applications and middleware components from which they can pick and choose software elements to fill gaps in expertise and immediately integrate complex, differentiating features.

Wind River also delivers software and systems integration services to support customers, with automotive capabilities and technologies such as hyperboot to reduce IVI boot time; firmware management delivering updates to Android devices, supporting both online and offline update methods, and Bluetooth IVI extensions to control personal phones via the in-vehicle center console.

As consumer electronics and automotive worlds continue to blend, the role of software is becoming increasingly more important. The auto industry is racing to offer sophisticated IVI features but often lacks the necessary embedded device software expertise and needs additional assistance from domain experts, as is the case with Android. Properly integrating cutting-edge software in advanced IVI systems within the complex automotive environment presents additional challenges.

“Android’s capability for rapid innovation has made it a popular platform option for many industries such as automotive,” says Chris Buerger, senior director of product management at Wind River. “Consumers increasingly expect connectivity and rich user experiences regardless of where they are, including in the car. Wind River helps customers overcome the complexities of bringing Android into an automotive environment and rapidly develop devices that deliver a rich, connected experience. Wind River has the ideal mix of decades of embedded device experience, successful Android technologies and deep vertical industry knowledge and relationships.”

Source:http://johndayautomotivelectronics.com/?p=9890

Vyatta speeds up its software-based routing with vPlane

April 18th, 2012

Virtualized router pioneer Vyatta plans to increase the performance of its software by 10 times or more later this year, eyeing large data centers with virtualized multicore servers.

At the same time, the company is phasing out dedicated appliances designed primarily for small and medium-sized enterprises and branch offices. A growing number of those types of customers now choose to run Vyatta software on the same servers that run their applications, CEO Kelly Herrell said. Vyatta expects to sell its last appliances around the middle of this year.

Vyatta sells software that performs higher-level network functions such as routing and security, which traditionally have been carried out by dedicated equipment. The Vyatta vPlane technology that the company announced on Tuesday is designed to take advantage of servers based on powerful, multicore x86 architectures such as Intel’s Sandy Bridge, which offer as many as 24 cores per CPU. Doing so increases packet throughput and makes it easier to scale out routing performance to handle growing traffic loads, Herrell said.

With vPlane, Vyatta will separate the software for its control plane, which makes traffic-handling decisions, and for its forwarding plane, which carries them out. In Vyatta’s current software, those appear as a single workload and have to run on the same core. Once they are separated, they’ll be able to run on separate cores, and enterprises will be able to implement the forwarding software on as many cores as they need to scale out performance, Herrell said. The vPlane technology is being tested now.

The new forwarding plane’s performance is more than 10 times higher on each core it runs on, so with additional cores, it can boost Vyatta’s speed even more. On an Intel Westmere-class system, Vyatta with vPlane can deliver more than 8 million packets per second per core. Across a single 1U rack server based on Westmere, the new technology can handle 35 million packets per second, the company claims.

Vyatta doesn’t replace the Layer 2 switches that link one server or rack to another with simple packet forwarding, but the intelligent routing decisions it makes can reduce unnecessary trips from one server to another, according to Herrell. That function is growing more valuable as enterprises run more applications on virtual machines spread across many hardware servers, he said. Traffic among those VMs may not have to leave the immediate server or rack, where Vyatta is running alongside other applications.

Since it hit the market in 2008, Vyatta has focused on turning routing into an application for standard x86 servers, promising to help customers avoid the high cost of dedicated routers. Customers can choose their own server platforms on which to run the software. Traditional data-center routers cost about US$10,000 to $20,000 per gigabit per second of forwarding performance, while Vyatta with vPlane will cost only $100 per gigabit per second, Herrell said. Vyatta also gives enterprises more flexibility in planning, because they can add standard computing hardware over time instead of having to buy a traditional, dedicated router with enough capacity to handle future needs, he said.

As recently as a year ago, Vyatta itself was introducing new models of dedicated appliances based on standard x86 boxes from a manufacturer in Taiwan. In April 2011, it announced three routing and security appliances designed for customers ranging from small and branch offices to midsized enterprises. The company priced the products from $997 to $3,397 and positioned them against Cisco’s ISR (Integrated Services Router) line. But those products are now being phased out.

“That was just a tactical issue to get around any buying objections if someone was used to buying a box,” Herrell said in an interview on Tuesday. Appliances never made up more than 20 percent of the company’s sales, he said. Herrell would not disclose how many of the appliances Vyatta had sold. Channel partners can still build and sell such systems, but Vyatta is now focused on the idea of networking as software, he said.

“I’ve been very, very careful to not let Vyatta become a hardware product, because we believed that the trends were going to be toward the adoption of software-based networking,” Herrell said. “We didn’t want a business model that was predicated on selling expensive hardware when the hardware portion of the sale, we believed, was going to go away.”

With virtualization and centralization of computing workloads, more small, medium and branch offices are now running Vyatta’s software on existing or new multipurpose servers, Herrell said. About 1,000 such customers have already taken this approach, he said.

Meanwhile, large enterprises and cloud service providers are a growing part of Vyatta’s business, and the company has a customer base of large data centers “in the low dozens,” Herrell said. “We have seen a really significant jump in large accounts and data center interest.”

Source:http://www.itworld.com/networking/268808/vyatta-speeds-its-software-based-routing-vplane

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