Mobile Application Testing – 01 Synergy

April 4th, 2012 by Rahul No comments »

01 Synergy offers a complete and comprehensive range of Mobile Application testing services from Unit Testing to User Acceptance Testing. Complexities across handset makers, carriers, locations and operating systems has made building bug-free mobile apps really difficult.

Our areas of expertise include:

  • Requirements Capture and Analysis
  • Test Planning
  • Test case Design
  • Test Execution
  • Defect Tracking & Management
  • Reporting
  • Test Metrics

01 Synergy offers a wide range of Mobile Application testing services, including:

  • Functional Testing
  • Security Testing
  • Load & Performance Testing
  • Localization Testing
  • Usability Testing

Our QA professionals can help you with all your Mobile App testing projects,  including:

  • iOS Application Testing (iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch)
  • Android Application Testing
  • BlackBerry Application Testing
  • Windows Phone 7 Application Testing

01 Synergy is here to help, if you have a need to discuss Mobile application testing, agile testing, do count on us to help. Visit us online at www.01sqa.com or send us a mail here: mobile.testing@01synergy.com

The Dentist Office Software Story

July 30th, 2014 by Amrinder No comments »

I’ve been telling this fictional story about Dentist Office Software for years to describe why we are so focused on our “networks” investment strategy. Yesterday I told it at a HackNY event we did at the USV office and my partner Albert provided a finishing touch that really drives it home. Since I’ve never told the Dentist Office Software story here at AVC, I will do that and then I will add Albert’s alternate (and better) ending.

An entrepreneur, tired of the long waits he is experiencing in his dentist’s office, decides that dentist offices are badly managed. So he designs and builds a comprehensive dentist office management system and brings it to market. The software is expensive, at $25,000 per year per dentist office, but it’s a hit anyway as dentists realize significant cost savings after deploying the system. The company, Dentasoft, grows quickly into a $100mm annual revenue business, goes public, and trades up to a billion dollar valuation.

Two young entrepreneurs graduate from college, and go to YC. They pitch PG on a low cost version of Dentasoft, which will be built on a modern software stock and include mobile apps for the dentist to remotely manage his office from the golf course. PG likes the idea and they are accepted into YC. Their company, Dent.io, gets their product in market quickly and prices it at $5,000 per year per office. Dentists like this new entrant and start switching over in droves. Dentasoft misses its quarter, citing competitive pressures, churn, and declining revenues. Dentasoft stock crashes. Meanwhile, Dent.io does a growth round from Sequoia and hires a CEO out of Workday.

Around this time, an open source community crops up to build an open source version of dental office software. This open source project is called DentOps. The project takes on real life as its leader, a former dentist turned socialist blogger and software developer named NitrousOxide, has a real agenda to disrupt the entire dental industry. A hosted version of DentOps called DentHub is launched and becomes very popular with forward thinking dentist offices that don’t want to be hostage to companies like Dentasoft and Dent.io anymore.

Dentasoft is forced to file for bankruptcy protection while they restructure their $100mm debt round they took a year after going public. Dent.io’s board fires its CEO and begs the founders to come back and take control of the struggling company. NitrousOxide is featured on the cover of Wired as the man who disrupted the dental industry.

—————

That’s the story. I hope to fine folks at YC, Sequoia, and Workday don’t mind me using their names in this fictional story. I picked the very best companies in the industry and my use of their brands is a compliment. I hope they take it that way.

This story is designed to illustrate the fact that software alone is a commodity. There is nothing stopping anyone from copying the feature set, making it better, cheaper, and faster. And they will do that. This is the reality that Brad and I stared at in 2003 as we were developing our initial investment thesis for USV. We saw the cloud coming but did not want to invest in commodity software delivered in the cloud. So we asked ourselves, “what will provide defensibility” and the answer we came to was networks of users, transactions, or data inside the software. We felt that if an entrepreneur could include something other than features and functions in their software, something that was not a commodity, then their software would be more defensible. That led us to social media, to Delicious, Tumblr, and Twitter. And marketplaces like Etsy, Lending Club, and Kickstarter. And enterprise oriented networks like Workmarket, C2FO, and SiftScience. We have not perfectly executed our investment strategy by any means. We’ve missed a lot of amazing networks. And we’ve invested in things that weren’t even close to networks. But all of that said, our thesis has delivered for us and we stick to it as much as we can.

So here’s Albert’s alternate ending (with my editorial license on the colorful aspects of this story):

A young dentist, named Hoff Reidman, just starting up his own private practice, decides that he wants to network with other dentists. Because Hoff went to CMU before going to dental school, he’s pretty technical and he hacks together a site in Ruby called Dentistry.com. He emails all of his friends from dental school and they sign up. Every dentist wants to be on Dentistry.com and the site takes off. Hoff realizes he has to quit his dental practice to focus on Dentistry.com. Albert Wenger, who happens to be a patient of Hoff’s, convinces him to let USV do a small seed round of $1mm to help build a company around Dentistry.com. Hoff comes up with a product roadmap that allows patients to have profiles on Dentistry.com where they can keep their dental records, book appointments, and keep track of their dental health. It also includes mobile apps for patients to remind them to floss and brush at least twice a day. While Dentistry.com is free to use for anyone (dentist or patient), it monetizes with native advertising, transactions between dentists and their patients, and transactions between patients and providers of consumer dental health products, and transactions between dentists and providers of dental equipment and products. Dentistry.com ultimately grows into a $1bn revenue company and goes public trades at a market cap of $7.5bn. Wall Street analysts love the company citing its market power and defensible network effects.

Source:http://www.businessinsider.com/the-dentist-office-software-story-2014-7?IR=T

The secret to great presentations: it’s not about the software

July 30th, 2014 by Amrinder No comments »

I’ve sat through countless dull PowerPoint and Keynote presentations. And I’ll admit that some of my own have been snoozers, too. Based on my observations of presentations by others, and on feedback I’ve received about my own, I’d like to share one simple tip for making your presentations better: Don’t focus on your presentation software.

You read that right: In some of the most successful presentations I’ve seen, I barely noticed what was on the screen. If your audience leaves feeling informed, inspired, or entertained, you’ve done a better job than if they leave talking about your fancy 3D effects.
Start with the message

Nobody watches an Apple keynote to see the slides. They watch to see Tim Cook and other executives in action and learn about new products. Sure, there’ll be interesting some photos, charts, and statistics. But those are there only to supplement and reinforce what the speakers say. Or consider politicians, preachers, comedians, and TED presenters, all of whom convey the bulk of their messages with speech alone. The essence of your talk is the words you say, not what you put on the screen.

So focus on those words first. Figure out the message or facts you want your audience to leave with, and map out a talk that accomplishes your goal. Practice until you can deliver it with little or no reliance on notes. Then—and only then—start looking for ways to add supporting visuals with presentation software.
Fight the presentation-as-handout meme

How many times have you seen a presentation in which the speaker does little more than read what’s on the slides? My feeling is that if all the essential text from my presentation is on my slides, I might as well just distribute a PDF and stay home. I want my audience to pay attention, to be surprised, to smile and nod and laugh at the right places. I want to be able to use intonation and body language to convey feelings that text alone would miss.

I’ve sat through countless dull PowerPoint and Keynote presentations. And I’ll admit that some of my own have been snoozers, too. Based on my observations of presentations by others, and on feedback I’ve received about my own, I’d like to share one simple tip for making your presentations better: Don’t focus on your presentation software.

You read that right: In some of the most successful presentations I’ve seen, I barely noticed what was on the screen. If your audience leaves feeling informed, inspired, or entertained, you’ve done a better job than if they leave talking about your fancy 3D effects.
Start with the message

Nobody watches an Apple keynote to see the slides. They watch to see Tim Cook and other executives in action and learn about new products. Sure, there’ll be interesting some photos, charts, and statistics. But those are there only to supplement and reinforce what the speakers say. Or consider politicians, preachers, comedians, and TED presenters, all of whom convey the bulk of their messages with speech alone. The essence of your talk is the words you say, not what you put on the screen.

So focus on those words first. Figure out the message or facts you want your audience to leave with, and map out a talk that accomplishes your goal. Practice until you can deliver it with little or no reliance on notes. Then—and only then—start looking for ways to add supporting visuals with presentation software.
Fight the presentation-as-handout meme

How many times have you seen a presentation in which the speaker does little more than read what’s on the slides? My feeling is that if all the essential text from my presentation is on my slides, I might as well just distribute a PDF and stay home. I want my audience to pay attention, to be surprised, to smile and nod and laugh at the right places. I want to be able to use intonation and body language to convey feelings that text alone would miss.

As a result, I never put everything I say (or anywhere close to it) on my slides. I politely decline to provide attendees a copy of my presentation (which wouldn’t be very useful, after all), and instead I often prepare separate PDF or printed handouts to be distributed after my talk, that include all the main points, URLs, and other details, in a more-readable form.
Embrace simplicity

All things being equal, simple text and images are the way to go. Text-heavy slides, complex images, cutesy animations, flashy transitions, and other such embellishments are more of a distraction than an aid. You don’t want your audience to say, “Wow, what great Keynote skills that presenter had!” You want them to remember what you said.

So I recommend choosing an uncluttered, high-contrast theme (such as Gradient or Showroom in Keynote, or Twilight or Clarity in PowerPoint) and, where practical, limiting each slide to a single element (such as an image, graph, quote, or question). Select visuals that support, explain, or clarify what you say. They’re on the screen to help your audience understand and remember your talk, not to serve as cues or reminders of what you want to say—that’s what Presenter Notes are for in Keynote or PowerPoint. (In Keynote, you may need to choose View > Show Presenter Notes to see the area at the bottom of the window where you can enter them. In either app, these notes appear on your Mac’s screen during a presentation only when your presentation is on a secondary display.)
Consider your audience and purpose

That said, every audience and presentation is different, and sometimes the sort of minimalism that’s great for a motivational talk is not what you need. So keep listeners’ expectations in mind as you prepare your presentation.

For example, if your audience is made up of corporate VPs and your topic is last quarter’s sales figures, everyone will be expecting to see the facts and numbers—not just hear about them. If you’re teaching a programming class, your students need to see sample code on the screen. If you’re introducing a new product, your customers want to see photos and feature lists. In these and many other cases, the stuff you put on screen is far more than window dressing, and it may sometimes require showing lots of text. There’s no shame in that, but still: keep that text as brief, readable, and relevant as you can.

Speaking of text: Bulleted lists may be boring, but there’s nothing inherently wrong with them, and sometimes they’re exactly what a fact-heavy presentation needs. If you do use bullets on slides, make sure the text is large enough that people in the back of the room can read it and be as concise as possible. I nearly always set up builds to display just one bullet at a time so that the audience isn’t tempted to read rather than listen.

To do this in Keynote, select your bulleted list, click Animate on the toolbar, click Build In, click Add an Effect, and then select one of the Appear & Move effects. From the Delivery pop-up menu, choose By Bullet. In PowerPoint, select your bulleted list, click the Animations tab, and click an entrance effect. Then, from the Effect Options pop-up menu, choose By Paragraph (the default).

These tips might seem to minimize all the effort you expended learning how to use your presentation software of choice. But, as I say, the software isn’t the point: the presentation is.

Source:http://www.macworld.com/article/2457994/the-secret-to-great-presentations-its-not-about-the-software.html

uTorrent Blocked : Malicious Threats Deem Found – NASDAQ:GOOGL in the way

July 30th, 2014 by Amrinder No comments »

BitTorrent Inc., the maker behind uTorrent is currently struggling for malicious threats that have been deemed found with the software. Recently, users have taken to the Online Forums in the recent days complaining that when they tried to download the newest version of uTorrent, NASDAQ:GOOGL stands in their way.

uTorrent, the most popular client used downloadable software in the market, is frequently used by internet hackers to illegally download a copyright content of the software. Since it is free and legal to use, it is quite possible that hackers can manipulate it. However, BitTorrent maintained its security so that it will not be used for illegal purposes. Yet the program has been downloaded by millions who uses it for its actual purpose, with Google Chrome trying to daunt them from doing so.

uTorrent.exe has been blocked by Chrome for it was found to be malicious. Furthermore, users were already informed that uTorrent version 3.4.2.32354 cannot be downloaded in Chrome and any browsers. However, Chrome bargains to renovate the file, accompanied by a second pop-up with another warning signal bearing the contents: “This file will harm your computer”, as stated by TorrentFreak.

A cursory investigation conducted by Google’s Safe Browsing Diagnostic page designates that uuTrrent may have been hacked. The updates come shortly after uTorrent made it possible for users to download the software without viewing advertisements.

With millions of new downloads available monthly, uTorrent is without a doubt the most commonly used software by millions or even billions of users. However, because of this malicious issue, the number of installs dropped down a bit as users try to discontinue downloads after receiving such report.

As uTorrent is facing this problem, most users are waiting for updates from the developers. A number of other torrent clients have been made similar to its features available in the past years, yet the changes have already been met by some uTorrent users.

Users just need to wait until this problem is already solved by BitTorrent Inc. in order to protect their PCs from being harmed by this malicious threat. As to date, developers opt to update the version, providing the users a safer software with a lot more features as compared to its predecessor. Once the update is finished, developers promised the public that they are going to release it with the guarantee of protecting them from the same issues. The newest version of uTorrent will still be free for download.

Source:http://www.streetwisetech.com/2014/07/utorrent-blocked-malicious-threats-deem-found-nasdaqgoogl-way/

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