Mobile Application Testing – 01 Synergy

April 4th, 2012 by Rahul No comments »

01 Synergy offers a complete and comprehensive range of Mobile Application testing services from Unit Testing to User Acceptance Testing. Complexities across handset makers, carriers, locations and operating systems has made building bug-free mobile apps really difficult.

Our areas of expertise include:

  • Requirements Capture and Analysis
  • Test Planning
  • Test case Design
  • Test Execution
  • Defect Tracking & Management
  • Reporting
  • Test Metrics

01 Synergy offers a wide range of Mobile Application testing services, including:

  • Functional Testing
  • Security Testing
  • Load & Performance Testing
  • Localization Testing
  • Usability Testing

Our QA professionals can help you with all your Mobile App testing projects,  including:

  • iOS Application Testing (iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch)
  • Android Application Testing
  • BlackBerry Application Testing
  • Windows Phone 7 Application Testing

01 Synergy is here to help, if you have a need to discuss Mobile application testing, agile testing, do count on us to help. Visit us online at www.01sqa.com or send us a mail here: mobile.testing@01synergy.com

BlackBerry pivots away from hardware to software and services

January 26th, 2015 by Amrinder No comments »

BlackBerry’s market share fell to about 0.5 percent in 2014. (Dado Ruvic/Reuters)
By Mohana Ravindranath January 25 at 12:36 PM Follow @ravindranize

For years, BlackBerry phones’ signature keyboard — a pragmatic, if unfashionable contrast to the sleek touch screens of iPhones and consumer models — was a popular feature among stalwart customers at businesses and federal agencies. At its peak in 2009, BlackBerry’s phones accounted for about 20 percent of the smartphone market, according to the research group International Data Corp.

Since then, amid competition from consumer-focused vendors such as Apple and Samsung, and increasingly common “bring your own device” policies permitting employees to access work correspondence from their personal phones, the Ontario company’s market share has steadily declined.

In 2014, BlackBerry’s market share plummeted to about 0.5 percent. Samsung led with 23.7 percent, followed by Apple with 11.7 percent, according to IDC. To compensate for falling hardware sales, BlackBerry has redirected its focus from the devices themselves to software and services, including those aimed at federal customers.

The new goal, BlackBerry Chief Operating Officer Marty Beard said in an interview, is to “innovate around the reality” of smartphone users who prefer non-BlackBerry phones. “There’s a perception in the industry . . . that we only support BlackBerry devices,” Beard said, but noted, “our software business has gone totally multi-[operating system].”

Despite shrinking revenue, in the past few months the company has announced several new applications that function on the Android, iOS and Windows operating systems — its popular messaging system BBM, or BlackBerry Balance, an app that separates work content from personal content, for instance. BlackBerry Enterprise Server is designed to manage thousands of employees, their devices and their applications in one system.

At the International CES expo in Las Vegas earlier this month, BlackBerry unveiled a new “Internet of Things” platform, designed to collect data from various trackable objects, such as automotive fleets. It also announced plans to make its messaging system available on Android-based “smartwatches.”

BlackBerry also announced a partnership with IT company Nanthealth to create a portable hub designed to collect data transmitted among patients, doctors and hospitals.

BlackBerry’s contracts with the federal government also reflect this new emphasis on software, according to Matt Hummer, director of analytics for government research analytics service Govini.

According to Govini, which tracks public records of federal contracts, BlackBerry’s contracts for new devices have leveled, while software contracts have grown. In 2011, BlackBerry’s federal contracts peaked at more than $90 million — by 2014, they had shrunk to about $40 million. (BlackBerry does not share financial figures about public vs. private customers.) This shift is due in part to bring-your-own-device policies at the department level, Hummer said — even the Defense Department has approved BlackBerry’s secure application for iOS and Android devices.

In general, Hummer said, “as agencies loosen up their policy around type of device that can be used . . . the commercial and public trending of purchases of smartphones would more align with the government’s.”

As of November, hardware sales constituted approximately 46 percent of revenue, and BlackBerry’s revenue and hardware sales have been declining sequentially. For the quarter ended Nov. 29, the company reported revenue of $793 million, down from $916 million the previous quarter and $966 million the quarter before that. In the quarter ended Nov. 29, the company sold 1.9 million smartphones, down from 2.4 million in the second quarter and 2.6 million in the first quarter. (BlackBerry recently denied rumors that it had engaged in discussions with Samsung about being acquired by the South Korean conglomerate.)

“The company clearly in transition from being a former smartphone leader to now transforming a business to sell a select few or a select handful of smartphones to enterprise government customers,” Morningstar analyst Brian Colello said. “Typically the business model was the reverse — typically BlackBerry would give CIOs software for free to allow them to manage the handsets” they sell to customers.

Despite a few new hardware announcements, such as the BlackBerry Passport, a touch-screen smartphone with a keyboard released in September or the BlackBerry Classic, an update to the iconic phone with more screen space — “it’s clear BlackBerry is not going to re-emerge as a phone that has 20, 25 percent of market share of the entire smartphone space,” Colello said.

Instead, he said, BlackBerry’s strategy has been to “retain the most loyal users they have” — making it easier for employees and companies to access the platform, even if they’ve moved on to newer devices.

Beard is not ready to give up that easy: The focus on software and services could generate more interest in hardware, he insists.

“It has a halo effect on the BlackBerry side,” he said. “As more people download the software, they buy more handsets.”

Source:http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/on-it/blackberry-pivots-away-from-hardware-to-software-and-services/2015/01/23/e331f788-9dcd-11e4-a7ee-526210d665b4_story.html

8 useful (and free) antivirus apps to protect your Android or Windows device

January 26th, 2015 by Amrinder No comments »

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We are constantly being told that malware is a threat to our computers, laptops, smartphones, and tablets. Daily reports tell us that we have plenty to worry about. Under the umbrella of malicious software you’ll find all sorts of nasties sheltered away, including viruses, Trojans, adware, exploits, worms, monitoring tools, and spyware. Part of the problem is that the people talking up the threat are the very security companies trying to sell us their software.

The fact that there were 82,000 new malware strains per day in 2013, as reported by Panda Security, or that Sophos Labs found 650,000 Android malware instances isn’t all that meaningful for the average user. We’re mostly convinced of the need for security software on our computers and laptops at least. According to Microsoft’s latest Security Intelligence Report Volume 17, more than three-quarters of the world’s Internet-connected PCs have real-time security software. That percentage is much higher in the U.S. and Europe.

Related: Top 5 Android security apps, Best free antivirus software
Paid vs free

We accept there’s a threat to our devices, and we need a solution. Most of us just want to know that we’re protected, but do we need to pay to stay safe? Is an expensive package or a monthly subscription the only way to be sure?

No, it’s not. Many free solutions are just as effective as premium products. Sometimes you’re paying for a raft of extra security-related features, but the basic free versions offer the safety you really need.

In some cases, the premium products do offer extra value, but it’s not an assumption that’s safe to make without checking first. You need to do some due diligence on your prospective security app before you decide which one to choose.
How to find the best free anti-malware

Your first port of call should be AV-Test. It’s an independent organization that tests security software for Windows, Mac, and mobile platforms. The testers at AV-Test bombard the apps with real-world threats and rank them based on how well they cope. You’ll get a high-level overview that shows you how each security app rates for protection, performance, and usability.

You’ll generally find that there are free security apps that caught 100 percent of the malware they tested. They may not score as highly in terms of performance or usability, but the protection column should always be given the most weight. Reject anything that doesn’t have a 100-percent record. You can use the performance and usability results in the report to filter your list down further.

Select a handful of potential security apps, then cross check the pricing to find the best free options.

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January 24, 2015 — Kim Komando
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January 24, 2015 — Kim Komando

We are constantly being told that malware is a threat to our computers, laptops, smartphones, and tablets. Daily reports tell us that we have plenty to worry about. Under the umbrella of malicious software you’ll find all sorts of nasties sheltered away, including viruses, Trojans, adware, exploits, worms, monitoring tools, and spyware. Part of the problem is that the people talking up the threat are the very security companies trying to sell us their software.

The fact that there were 82,000 new malware strains per day in 2013, as reported by Panda Security, or that Sophos Labs found 650,000 Android malware instances isn’t all that meaningful for the average user. We’re mostly convinced of the need for security software on our computers and laptops at least. According to Microsoft’s latest Security Intelligence Report Volume 17, more than three-quarters of the world’s Internet-connected PCs have real-time security software. That percentage is much higher in the U.S. and Europe.

Related: Top 5 Android security apps, Best free antivirus software
Paid vs free

We accept there’s a threat to our devices, and we need a solution. Most of us just want to know that we’re protected, but do we need to pay to stay safe? Is an expensive package or a monthly subscription the only way to be sure?

No, it’s not. Many free solutions are just as effective as premium products. Sometimes you’re paying for a raft of extra security-related features, but the basic free versions offer the safety you really need.

In some cases, the premium products do offer extra value, but it’s not an assumption that’s safe to make without checking first. You need to do some due diligence on your prospective security app before you decide which one to choose.
How to find the best free anti-malware

Your first port of call should be AV-Test. It’s an independent organization that tests security software for Windows, Mac, and mobile platforms. The testers at AV-Test bombard the apps with real-world threats and rank them based on how well they cope. You’ll get a high-level overview that shows you how each security app rates for protection, performance, and usability.

You’ll generally find that there are free security apps that caught 100 percent of the malware they tested. They may not score as highly in terms of performance or usability, but the protection column should always be given the most weight. Reject anything that doesn’t have a 100-percent record. You can use the performance and usability results in the report to filter your list down further.

Select a handful of potential security apps, then cross check the pricing to find the best free options.

360 Mobile Security

360 Mobile Security

360 Mobile Security

Narrowing it down

Now it’s time to read some detailed reviews. Try to find reviews on reputable sites and watch out for sponsored reviews. A detailed review will give you a closer look at the product with some screenshots and it should raise any additional issues you might be concerned about that the AV-Test reports didn’t examine. The more sources you find that recommend your chosen product, the more confident you can be about using it.
Skip ►muted

If you are concerned about privacy, then you really need to refer to the company’s official privacy policy. All security apps gather data, and they’ll often record your browsing history, email senders, and catalogue your files. Obviously, they aren’t supposed to collect any “personal” data and the data they do collect is to help them trace attacks and threats, but make no mistake, you are putting your trust in the company you choose. If you have concerns about the company you’re looking at, then keep looking.

It can also be a good idea to take a look at the support forum for your chosen product. You can get a quick overview of the problems that users may be having and see how the company deals with them.
Test it out yourself

You’ve probably honed it down to one or two products by now. It’s time to install one of them and test it. There’s no substitute for trying a piece of software out. Make sure you’ve got it configured correctly and run a full scan straight after installation. You should also consider setting up a regular scan schedule and allow the software to update itself frequently.

Latest Mobile News
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free on itunes
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Tech Q&A: Snooping apps, iPad space, speedier Internet and more
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January 25, 2015 — Fox News
Digital life hack: Turn your old phone into a security camera
Digital life hack: Turn your old phone into a security camera
January 24, 2015 — Fox News
5 ways to make money with your car or truck
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January 24, 2015 — Kim Komando
New security threat: Malicious advertising
New security threat: Malicious advertising
January 24, 2015 — Kim Komando
2+ million cars can be hacked remotely
2+ million cars can be hacked remotely
January 24, 2015 — Kim Komando

We are constantly being told that malware is a threat to our computers, laptops, smartphones, and tablets. Daily reports tell us that we have plenty to worry about. Under the umbrella of malicious software you’ll find all sorts of nasties sheltered away, including viruses, Trojans, adware, exploits, worms, monitoring tools, and spyware. Part of the problem is that the people talking up the threat are the very security companies trying to sell us their software.

The fact that there were 82,000 new malware strains per day in 2013, as reported by Panda Security, or that Sophos Labs found 650,000 Android malware instances isn’t all that meaningful for the average user. We’re mostly convinced of the need for security software on our computers and laptops at least. According to Microsoft’s latest Security Intelligence Report Volume 17, more than three-quarters of the world’s Internet-connected PCs have real-time security software. That percentage is much higher in the U.S. and Europe.

Related: Top 5 Android security apps, Best free antivirus software
Paid vs free

We accept there’s a threat to our devices, and we need a solution. Most of us just want to know that we’re protected, but do we need to pay to stay safe? Is an expensive package or a monthly subscription the only way to be sure?

No, it’s not. Many free solutions are just as effective as premium products. Sometimes you’re paying for a raft of extra security-related features, but the basic free versions offer the safety you really need.

In some cases, the premium products do offer extra value, but it’s not an assumption that’s safe to make without checking first. You need to do some due diligence on your prospective security app before you decide which one to choose.
How to find the best free anti-malware

Your first port of call should be AV-Test. It’s an independent organization that tests security software for Windows, Mac, and mobile platforms. The testers at AV-Test bombard the apps with real-world threats and rank them based on how well they cope. You’ll get a high-level overview that shows you how each security app rates for protection, performance, and usability.

You’ll generally find that there are free security apps that caught 100 percent of the malware they tested. They may not score as highly in terms of performance or usability, but the protection column should always be given the most weight. Reject anything that doesn’t have a 100-percent record. You can use the performance and usability results in the report to filter your list down further.

Select a handful of potential security apps, then cross check the pricing to find the best free options.

360 Mobile Security

360 Mobile Security

360 Mobile Security

Narrowing it down

Now it’s time to read some detailed reviews. Try to find reviews on reputable sites and watch out for sponsored reviews. A detailed review will give you a closer look at the product with some screenshots and it should raise any additional issues you might be concerned about that the AV-Test reports didn’t examine. The more sources you find that recommend your chosen product, the more confident you can be about using it.
Skip ►muted

If you are concerned about privacy, then you really need to refer to the company’s official privacy policy. All security apps gather data, and they’ll often record your browsing history, email senders, and catalogue your files. Obviously, they aren’t supposed to collect any “personal” data and the data they do collect is to help them trace attacks and threats, but make no mistake, you are putting your trust in the company you choose. If you have concerns about the company you’re looking at, then keep looking.

It can also be a good idea to take a look at the support forum for your chosen product. You can get a quick overview of the problems that users may be having and see how the company deals with them.
Test it out yourself

You’ve probably honed it down to one or two products by now. It’s time to install one of them and test it. There’s no substitute for trying a piece of software out. Make sure you’ve got it configured correctly and run a full scan straight after installation. You should also consider setting up a regular scan schedule and allow the software to update itself frequently.
Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Free (Windows)

Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Free (Windows)

New malware threats are evolving all the time, so you must allow your anti-virus software to update its database of known threats frequently. If you don’t, then you’re not properly protected. A scheduled scan once a week makes sense and most apps will do this automatically. Strictly speaking, since they run in real-time and check all new files on your device as they are installed or downloaded, you shouldn’t need to run another full manual scan after the first one.
Our top picks right now

To save you the legwork, here are the free products we recommend for different platforms right now (January 2015). These products all scored highly in the most recent AV-Test results and they’re easy to use.

Android

360 Security – complete real-time protection with anti-theft and privacy tools.
AVL – lightweight and effective malware protection without superfluous extras.
ESET – a well-designed security app offering free virus protection, also has a tablet-optimized interface.
Sophos – simple, easy to use, and mercifully free of ads for the premium version.

Windows

Avira Free Antivirus – great detection rates make this a good choice for real-time protection.
Bitdefender Antivirus Free – a light touch, no ads, and effective, silent performance.
Malwarebytes Anti-Malware – if you have a problem and want to remove malware, then this is great, unfortunately the real-time protection requires a subscription, so install another option after successful removal.
Panda Free Antivirus – complete protection, simple interface, and a light system footprint.

Don’t rest on your laurels

We know you don’t really want to hear this, but the truth is that you need to reassess your chosen security software every few months, once a year at the very least. The steady stream of new malware means security is a constant battle. If you take a look at the AV-Test reports over the months and years you’ll see how much fluctuation there is at the top of the security software chart. Just because your app is good now, doesn’t mean it will continue to provide the best coverage in the future.

It’s worth remembering that your actual exposure to risk on any device, regardless of platform, is most influenced by how you use it. The vast majority of malware on Android can be dodged quite easily by only ever downloading and installing apps with high numbers of downloads and reviews from the Play Store.

Clicking on links in emails from untrusted or unknown sources, downloading files from dodgy websites, and overriding or ignoring security warnings on any device is apt cause you problems. Common sense goes a long way toward combating threats and it doesn’t cost money either. Combine it with a high-rated, free anti-virus app and you can relax and enjoy your devices without fear of malware.

Source:http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/best-android-windows-antivirus/

Lottery modifies software after complaints from retailers

January 26th, 2015 by Amrinder No comments »

Lottery modifies software after complaints from retailers
Franchise criticised over new technology platform rolled out late last year
The new technology underpinning the State’s largest gaming franchise has been the source of controversy since its instalment late last year. Photograph: istock

The new technology underpinning the State’s largest gaming franchise has been the source of controversy since its instalment late last year. Photograph: istock

Eoin Burke-Kennedy

Topics:
Business
Retail
Eoin Burke Kennedy
Intralot
National Lottery

Mon, Jan 26, 2015, 01:00

First published: Mon, Jan 26, 2015, 01:00

The National Lottery operator has modified the software on its new ticket terminals following complaints from retailers.

The franchise also said it would take a further six weeks to enable the in-store ticket checkers to interface with the new terminals.

Currently, the ticket checkers only work for lotto tickets purchased under the former system which was replaced in early December as part of an agreed systems upgrade.This has placed an extra burden on retail staff, causing delays at peak times.

The new technology underpinning the State’s largest gaming has been the source of controversy since its instalment late last year.

Retailers say technical glitches with the new ticket terminals, supplied by Greek gaming firm Intralot, has disrupted trade.

In particular, they complain the camera in the machines, which is used to scan tickets, is prone to freezing, forcing retail staff to reboot the ticket terminals.

Operator Premier Lotteries Ireland (PLI) acknowledged it had identified delays in response times on some terminals but has since installed a modification to the software to address the problem.

“We are currently handling over half a million retail transactions per day. We are aware of some very minor functionality issues and we have developed a software update resolving this,” a spokesman said.

Lottery modifies software after complaints from retailers
Franchise criticised over new technology platform rolled out late last year
The new technology underpinning the State’s largest gaming franchise has been the source of controversy since its instalment late last year. Photograph: istock

The new technology underpinning the State’s largest gaming franchise has been the source of controversy since its instalment late last year. Photograph: istock

Eoin Burke-Kennedy

Topics:
Business
Retail
Eoin Burke Kennedy
Intralot
National Lottery

Mon, Jan 26, 2015, 01:00

First published: Mon, Jan 26, 2015, 01:00

The National Lottery operator has modified the software on its new ticket terminals following complaints from retailers.

The franchise also said it would take a further six weeks to enable the in-store ticket checkers to interface with the new terminals.

Currently, the ticket checkers only work for lotto tickets purchased under the former system which was replaced in early December as part of an agreed systems upgrade.This has placed an extra burden on retail staff, causing delays at peak times.

The new technology underpinning the State’s largest gaming has been the source of controversy since its instalment late last year.

Retailers say technical glitches with the new ticket terminals, supplied by Greek gaming firm Intralot, has disrupted trade.

In particular, they complain the camera in the machines, which is used to scan tickets, is prone to freezing, forcing retail staff to reboot the ticket terminals.

Operator Premier Lotteries Ireland (PLI) acknowledged it had identified delays in response times on some terminals but has since installed a modification to the software to address the problem.

“We are currently handling over half a million retail transactions per day. We are aware of some very minor functionality issues and we have developed a software update resolving this,” a spokesman said.

‘Rigorous testing’
The group, which took over the running of the National Lottery in November, insisted the new technology had been “subject to a rigorous testing process in line with international best practice and industry standards.”

“We will continue to work with agents to assist them in getting used to the new technology,” the spokesman added.

The franchise is expected to take until mid-to-late March to interface all ticket checkers in shops with its new network of 3,700 ticket terminals. However, it insisted this had been flagged to retailers in advance.

Following reports of problems with the new system, Irish Times readers contacted the newspaper complaining of problems with the lotto’s newly revamped digital channel.

One reader said he was no longer getting email confirmations of his purchases. He also said he had received an email telling him he had won a prize when he had not, but got no email when he had won prizes on other occasions.

Source:http://www.irishtimes.com/business/retail-and-services/lottery-modifies-software-after-complaints-from-retailers-1.2078968

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