Mobile Application Testing – 01 Synergy

April 4th, 2012 by Rahul No comments »

01 Synergy offers a complete and comprehensive range of Mobile Application testing services from Unit Testing to User Acceptance Testing. Complexities across handset makers, carriers, locations and operating systems has made building bug-free mobile apps really difficult.

Our areas of expertise include:

  • Requirements Capture and Analysis
  • Test Planning
  • Test case Design
  • Test Execution
  • Defect Tracking & Management
  • Reporting
  • Test Metrics

01 Synergy offers a wide range of Mobile Application testing services, including:

  • Functional Testing
  • Security Testing
  • Load & Performance Testing
  • Localization Testing
  • Usability Testing

Our QA professionals can help you with all your Mobile App testing projects,  including:

  • iOS Application Testing (iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch)
  • Android Application Testing
  • BlackBerry Application Testing
  • Windows Phone 7 Application Testing

01 Synergy is here to help, if you have a need to discuss Mobile application testing, agile testing, do count on us to help. Visit us online at www.01sqa.com or send us a mail here: mobile.testing@01synergy.com

Pen drives make it easy for hackers to enter your computer and you can’t do anything about it

August 1st, 2014 by Amrinder No comments »

USB devices such as keyboards, thumb-drives and mice can be used to hack into personal computers in a potential new class of attacks that evade all known security protections, a top computer researcher revealed on Thursday.

Karsten Nohl, chief scientist with Berlin’s SR Labs, noted that hackers could load malicious software onto tiny, low-cost computer chips that control functions of USB devices but which have no built-in shields against tampering with their code.

“You cannot tell where the virus came from. It is almost like a magic trick,” said Nohl, whose research firm is known for uncovering major flaws in mobile phone technology.

The finding shows that bugs in software used to run tiny electronics components that are invisible to the average computer user can be extremely dangerous when hackers figure out how to exploit them. Security researchers have increasingly turned their attention to uncovering such flaws.

Nohl said his firm has performed attacks by writing malicious code onto USB control chips used in thumb drives and smartphones. Once the USB device is attached to a computer, the malicious software can log keystrokes, spy on communications and destroy data, he said.

Computers do not detect the infections when tainted devices are inserted because anti-virus programs are only designed to scan for software written onto memory and do not scan the “firmware” that controls the functioning of those devices, he said.

Nohl and Jakob Lell, a security researcher at SR Labs, will describe their attack method at next week’s Black Hat hacking conference in Las Vegas, in a presentation titled: “Bad USB – On Accessories that Turn Evil.”

Thousands of security professionals gather at the annual conference to hear about the latest hacking techniques, including ones that threaten the security of business computers, consumer electronics and critical infrastructure.

Nohl said he would not be surprised if intelligence agencies, like the National Security Agency, have already figured out how to launch attacks using this technique.

Last year, he presented research at Black Hat on breakthrough methods for remotely attacking SIM cards on mobile phones. In December, documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden demonstrated that the U.S. spy agency was using a similar technique for surveillance, which it called “Monkey Calendar.”

An NSA spokeswoman declined to comment.

SR Labs tested the technique by infecting controller chips made by major Taiwanese manufacturer, Phison Electronics Corp , and placing them in USB memory drives and smartphones running Google Inc’s Android operating system.

Alex Chiu, an attorney with Phison, told Reuters via email that Nohl had contacted the company about his research in May.

“Mr. Nohl did not offer detailed analysis together with work product to prove his finding,” Chiu said. “Phison does not have ground to comment (on) his allegation.”

Chiu said that “from Phison’s reasonable knowledge and belief, it is hardly possible to rewrite Phison’s controller firmware without accessing our confidential information.”

Similar chips are made by Silicon Motion Technology Corp and Alcor Micro Corp. Nohl said his firm did not test devices with chips from those manufacturers.

Google did not respond to requests for comment. Officials with Silicon Motion and Alcor Micro could not immediately be reached.

Nohl believed hackers would have a “high chance” of corrupting other kinds of controller chips besides those made by Phison, because their manufacturers are not required to secure software. He said those chips, once infected, could be used to infect mice, keyboards and other devices that connect via USB.

“The sky is the limit. You can do anything at all,” he said.

In his tests, Nohl said he was able to gain remote access to a computer by having the USB instruct the computer to download a malicious program with instructions that the PC believed were coming from a keyboard. He was also able to change what are known as DNS network settings on a computer, essentially instructing the machine to route Internet traffic through malicious servers.

Once a computer is infected, it could be programmed to infect all USB devices that are subsequently attached to it, which would then corrupt machines that they contact.

“Now all of your USB devices are infected. It becomes self-propagating and extremely persistent,” Nohl said. “You can never remove it.”

Christof Paar, a professor of electrical engineering at Germany’s University of Bochum who reviewed the findings, said he believed the new research would prompt others to take a closer look at USB technology, and potentially lead to the discovery of more bugs. He urged manufacturers to improve protection of their chips to thwart attacks.

“The manufacturer should make it much harder to change the software that runs on a USB stick,” Paar said.

Source:http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/pen-drives-make-it-easy-for-hackers-to-enter-your-computer/1/375124.html

Pure Retirement launches with Phoebus Software

August 1st, 2014 by Amrinder No comments »

Pure Retirement, the equity release specialist which launched in February, is using the Phoebus Equity Release solution as its new business originations and servicing platform. The businesses have agreed an initial five year contract.

The system includes a complete adviser toolkit containing product and property guides and compliant document generation.

Phoebus Software Limited’s (PSL) sales and marketing director, Richard Pike, commented: “Pure Retirement is an exciting new entrant to the equity release market run by a highly experienced management team. It is a company with ambitious plans so it needed a solution that would be fully functioning from day one but which can adapt as the company grows and diversifies. Pure Retirement only accepts business via intermediaries and the Phoebus equity release web originations solution is already proven to be easy for advisers to access and use.”

Paul Carter, managing director of Pure Retirement, added: “We chose PSL because it has a proven track record in equity release originations and servicing solutions. We were aware of the pedigree of both the business and the solution and have found the PSL team at all levels both knowledgeable and easy to work with. This gave us confidence they would provide a quality solution in the time and to the scale that we needed and this objective was 100 per cent achieved.”

Source:http://www.mortgagefinancegazette.com/technology/pure-retirement-launches-with-phoebus-software/

Daimler certifies solidThinking Inspire software tool

August 1st, 2014 by Amrinder No comments »

Daimler AG has officially certified solidThinking Inspire, a product that enables design engineers to create and investigate structurally efficient concepts quickly and easily. With this certification, the tool becomes available to all design engineers at the customer as part of the Altair HyperWorks computer-aided engineering software suite.

Traditional structural simulations allow engineers to check if a design will support the required loads; solidThinking Inspire enhances this process by directly generating an optimal new material layout within a given design space using loads as an input. The automotive industry is continually striving for lighter and more structurally efficient designs to meet global emission regulations while improving product performance.

With solidThinking Inspire, these goals can now be achieved during the initial conceptual design phase of a new component or system, since the tool supports a simulation driven design process. Furthermore, solidThinking Inspire helps design engineers follow the functional and resource-efficient design rules found within nature – an approach often called biomimicry – for additional inspiration.

This typically results in more organic looking shapes and structures than traditional design methods. With the Daimler certification, all design engineers within the car and truck development departments of the company may now use solidThinking Inspire within their projects, giving them an opportunity to create efficient structures with minimum weight.

This works for components, assemblies, and entire systems. Design engineers may also use solidThinking Inspire to apply a required stiffness on a component where needed, helping to avoid undesired vibrations and contributing to overall vehicle comfort and quality. “Historically, the sophisticated optimization technology contained within solidThinking Inspire was only available to simulation specialists.

This technology can now be used where it offers the greatest return – within the concept phase of a new development project,” said Pietro Cervellera, Managing Director Altair Engineering GmbH. “We are thrilled about the certification and look forward to supporting the organization both during and after deployment.”

Source:http://www.fibre2fashion.com/news/textiles-technology-news/newsdetails.aspx?news_id=166486

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